We’ve had a few tornado warnings this afternoon across North Texas, but it seems that flooding has been the most widespread impact reported thus far. A significant severe weather threat remains forecast this evening and tonight in Northeast Texas and in East Texas. Damaging straight-line winds, heavy rain, and some hail will also be possible as a squall line moves east into the Brazos Valley, Coastal Plains, Southeast Texas, and the Upper Texas Coast tonight. Hurricane-force straight-line winds are possible with the strongest segments in the squall line tonight in East Texas and Northeast Texas. Again, I have particular concerns about falling trees on roadways, vehicles, and structures. We’re in ‘nowcast’ mode with an emphasis on rapid-fire updates on our social media channels along with our live video tab. You can keep up with storms in your area with our free HD interactive weather radar.

23Z HRRR: Simulated weather model radar from 8 PM tonight through 12 PM Saturday. Click on the image for a larger version.

23Z HRRR: Simulated weather model radar from 8 PM tonight through 12 PM Saturday. Click on the image for a larger version.

Individual storms will move northeast at 50 MPH. The squall line itself will accelerate eastward in a few hours and continue to book it east into the Southeastern United States on Saturday. The line of storms is expected to be near Interstate 55 from Memphis, TN to Jackson, MS. Significant damaging winds are expected along with any ‘bowing’ segments within the squall line. Embedded tornadoes cannot be ruled out. Any individual thunderstorms ahead of the squall line, or supercelluar storm structures embedded within the squall line, could produce large hail and potentially a strong tornado.

The threat for severe weather will move east of Texas by 2 AM. In its wake? Light snow may fall in parts of the Texas Panhandle, West Texas, Big Country, and North Texas tonight and tomorrow morning. Minor accumulations of snow are possible.