Author: David Reimer

Several Rounds of Rain This Week for Western 1/2 of Texas

Astronomical fall began last week, although that means absolutely zilch when it comes to meteorological occurrences. Fourtinietly a pattern change will bring a taste of fall to the state this week into the upcoming weekend. A slow-moving upper-level low pressure in the southwestern United States will provide several rounds of precipitation through the middle of the week. That area of low pressure will also allow a cool front to progress south through the state this week. The front’s movement will be slow, so it’ll take until the end of the week for it to make it to the coast....

Read More

A Calming Voice for Texans hearing about Irma…

Good evening everyone! Please know that we continue to have rescues made today on the Upper Texas Coast while parts of the Brazos Valley and Southeast Texas start to switch into the first stages of recovery. It will take many months to likely several years. Folks will have to adapt to the ‘new normal’. With that said we’ll start looking ahead for future weather issues and let the news agencies take care of the current situation. Next week’s potential Gulf of Mexico storm has a ‘low’ probability of becoming a tropical depression/storm – and most data keeps it away from Texas. Some of you may have heard about a new hurricane called Irma today. Irma had a hissy fit earlier today and rapidly intensified from a 65 MPH tropical storm to a 115 MPH category 3 major hurricane in 12 hours. Irma will likely be a powerful hurricane as it moves across the Atlantic over the next several days. It is currently located over 4,000 miles east of Brownsville or about 1,725 east of the Leeward Islands. The center is located near 17.8N/35.6W for those who like to plot positions on a map. Understand that this is the climatological peak of the Atlantic Hurricane Season. The last several years have been fairly quiet, and after Harvey everyone’s nerves are frayed. You hear the word ‘hurricane’ and alarms start going...

Read More

Flash Flood Emergency: Jefferson, Newton, Hardin, Orange, Jasper Counties

Flash Flood EMERGENCY for life-threatening flooding for Jefferson, Newton, Hardin, Orange, Jasper Counties in far Southeast Texas. This includes Beaumont, Port Arthur, Orange, Nederland, Groves, Port Neches, Lumberton, Vidor, Bridge City, Silsbee, West Orange, Kountze, Sour Lake, Nome, Deweyville, Evadale, Central Gardens, Sabine Pass, Thicket, and Saratoga. Very heavy rainfall has been falling for several hours in associated with Harvey. 8 to 14 inches of rain has fallen in the past several hours and an additional 5 to 10 inches of rain are expected. In addition – tropical storm force winds of 40 to 60 MPH will be possible this evening. Listen to local emergency officials for evacuation orders. If you are safe in your location travel is strongly discouraged. Only travel if you need to move to higher ground and/or evacuate! Flash Flood Warning National Weather Service Lake Charles LA 319 PM CDT TUE AUG 29 2017 …FLASH FLOOD EMERGENCY FOR HARDIN… ORANGE and JEFFERSON COUNTIES… The National Weather Service in Lake Charles has extended the * Flash Flood Warning for… Jefferson County in southeastern Texas… Southwestern Newton County in southeastern Texas… Hardin County in southeastern Texas… Orange County in southeastern Texas… Southeastern Jasper County in southeastern Texas… * Until 1015 PM CDT Tuesday * At 318 PM CDT, gauge reports indicated heavy rain falling across the warned area. Flash flooding is already occurring. From eight to fourteen inches of...

Read More

Tuesday Afternoon Update on Harvey – Flash Flood Emergency for Beaumont

The center of Harvey is located about 65 miles south/southwest of Port Arthur Texas. Forward motion to the north/northeast has accelerated (finally) and is now 8 MPH. Hopefully, we’ll see that increase as we continue into tonight. Landfall is expected along the far Southeast Texas coastline or in Southwest Louisiana tonight – and Harvey will be moving into Lousiana on Wednesday. High winds and coastal flooding are expected through this evening along the Upper Texas Coast as Harvey moves onshore. The heaviest rains have set up this afternoon will be from High Island to Sabine Pass northwest into Beaumont,...

Read More

Early Tuesday Morning Update on Southeast Texas/Upper Texas Coast Rain

Rain is impacting portions of Southeast Texas and the Upper Texas Coast this morning, but luckily we’re not seeing the absurd rainfall rates we saw over the weekend. Training showers with an isolated thunderstorm have continued to impact portions of Southeast Texas and the Upper Texas Coast east of a Montgomery County to Fort Bend County to Brazoria county line. The heaviest rains have been just inland from the coast with moderate to locally heavy rainfall on Interstate 10 in Houston – becoming heavier eastward into Jefferson County. Rainfall rates have been averaging one-half inch to one and a half inches per hour for several hours. This additional rainfall will not allow for local tributaries or bayous to lower. We’re lucky if they’re holding steady, but some are increasing again. Considering most of them are at record levels, we’re in uncharted territory. Rainfall will continue through the pre-dawn hours, although I’m hoping we might start to see it decrease in intensity by 3-4AM. We’re going to have another day of rain potential, but we should be winding down on Wednesday as Harvey starts to pull northeast. See our Monday evening blog for the discussion on Harvey’s track and timeline. One excellent resource is the Harris County Flood Control District’s observation website. You can observe rainfall rates at varying time periods and check on the water levels at various points....

Read More

TSC Twitter Feed

Archives